20 April 2012: Rogers Arena, Vancouver, BC, Canada

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20 April 2012: Rogers Arena, Vancouver, BC

Contents

Setlist

  1. Mylo Xyloto
  2. Hurts Like Heaven
  3. In My Place
  4. Major Minus
  5. Lovers In Japan
  6. The Scientist
  7. Yellow
  8. Violet Hill
  9. God Put A Smile Upon Your Face
  10. Princess Of China
  11. Up In Flames
  12. Warning Sign
  13. Don't Let It Break Your Heart
  14. Viva La Vida
  15. Charlie Brown
  16. Paradise
  17. Us Against The World
  18. Clocks
  19. Fix You
  20. Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall

Photos

Photos from this show can be found at Coldplaying.com in the Gallery thread for Vancouver. http://www.coldplaying.com/forum/gallery/showgallery.php/cat/1935

Videos

Videos from this show can be found in the first post of the Coldplaying forum live thread for this show at http://www.coldplaying.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90962

Discussion

All post-show discussion for this show at the forum thread http://www.coldplaying.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90962

Fan Reviews

All fan reviews have been submitted to us by the members of Coldplaying.com[1], unless stated otherwise.


OH MY FUCKING GOD is all I have to say about tonight so far....but I'm still stunned right now. They came into my section and sang Us Against The World 5 ROWS UP FROM ME!!! I made so much eye contact with them safksbdg,fdgdfgg. Ommg people, I don't even like MX and that was amazing. I was standing on my chair to see them, and wow, must I say Guy is fucking sexy. Like I always knew that, but seriously, he's perfection. Okay, I'm really high right now and need to eat them sleep then I'll write a review or something I dunno what I'm saying. Oh and someone threw underwear on the stage hahah [thanks rainplay]


holy shit what a show.. i was scared that i wasn't gonna make cause there was a huge ass delay on the sky train.. apparently someone jumped off the train :/ and there was a hour wait for each sky train but i made it on the last train heading towards downtown.. anyways back to the show HOLY SHIT! it was amazing!! same songs as the festival tour but with a few new ones but i dont know its just being there live makes it 1000x better he was askign if everyone was high cause it was 4/20 and just chris being chris i will post videos tomorrow but i think im gonna go again cause it was just a facking great night [thanks VIVA.42]


I vaguely recall the first time I heard Yellow on the radio. It was right around the time I began playing guitar and thought the chords might be easy enough for me to give it a try. I also remember thinking: Hey, I like this song. Probably just a one-hit-wonder, though... Pretty sure that’s the most wrong I’ve ever been about anything I’ve ever thought in my life. I think more people worship Coldplay these days than Jesus, Elvis and that guy from Breaker High combined. Well, maybe not more than that guy from Breaker High. Coldplay came cruising through Vancouver recently as part of their world tour in support of their most recent album, Mylo Xyloto. I was so generously given the opportunity to see them play the first of their two consecutive shows at Rogers Arena, and I’m really glad I didn’t say no. I brought my beautiful wife along for the ride to share our first Coldplay ‘experience’ together. And an experience, it was. Whether you’re a die-hard fan, a casual listener, or a straight-up hater, you cannot deny the entertainment value Coldplay gives their ticket purchasers. The tickets aren’t cheap, but wow—do they make it worth every penny. You see, at every entry gate to get into Rogers Arena, each and every concert-goer was given a wristband. The colours of the wristbands ranged from yellow to pink to green to blue to white to orange. Once seated, the giant, round screens inside the venue flashed the message to put on your wristband as it is “part of the show”. At 9:03, the house lights go out. The crowd goes insane. A few fluorescent lights light up the back of the stage. The stage manager lights the path for arguably the world’s biggest band. The band members take their places, and with the first kick of the drum, the entire Rogers Arena is alit with multi-coloured flashing wristband lights. Like a scene from a sci-fi flick, or a happy drug hallucination—and it being 4-20 day in Vancouver, likely the latter of the two. Not only do the wristbands light up, but they pulse in time to the beat, sometimes alternating in tempo depending on colour and section. My lousy photos don’t do it the visual justice. I was slightly impressed. Ok, I was really impressed. The visual theatrics continued. In My Place was the second (or third?) tune and as eccentric and wacky leader Chris Martin ran down the long runway of the modest stage, cannons shot up millions of pieces of large, mulit-coloured confetti, showering the stage and the crowd. I really couldn’t wipe the smirk off my face if I tried. At this point in the blog post, I must admit to you all that I’m not the biggest Coldplay fan out there. I do enjoy their tunes and own an album or two, but have never seen them live. I’ve heard great things about their live show, but never imagined it would be quite like this. Never.** Throughout the set, more visual treats ensued with about 20-30 giant ‘Mylo Xyloto’ beach ball were getting tossed around the arena while multiple laser lights, spotlights and strobe lights tantalized the crowd. Oh yeah—the music. I do really enjoy some Coldplay tunes. Of the tunes they played last night, I thoroughly enjoyed Violet Hill, God Put A Smile Upon Your Face, Clocks, Warning Sign and Fix You. I could have happily done without the Rihanna tune, but that’s just me being a music snob. I really would have loved to have heard Shiver (the ode to Jeff Buckley), Talk, Don’t Panic, and Everything’s Not Lost. So yes, my only complaint with the show would be the set list. And yes, usually that would make for a mediocre review, but this show was about more than the music: it was about lights, confetti and balloons; it was about dancing; it was about proving your worth; it was about entertainment value; it was about pouring everything you’ve got into what you do. From the beginning of the night, Chris Martin came across as a genuinely humbled musician, consistently thanking everyone for coming to see them play. He also couldn’t help but state several times that they “have the best fucking job in the world!” I would be hard-pressed to disagree. [thanksDylan http://morethanafeelingmusic.com/2012/04/21/coldplay-rogers-arena-vancouver-april-20-2012/]


I went to see Coldplay last night. I had seen them before at Pemberton Festival in 2008. I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect from this concert. I had listened to Mylo Xyloto prior to going and it had a definite electro flavour to it. When I arrived, I was handed this very GPS-tracker-looking wristband to wear as “part of the show.” To be honest, the show wasn’t much different from Viva La Vida. Actually, scratch that. Viva La Vida was a better Show. Mylo Xyloto was actually a pretty basic concert. Black lights and fluorescent paint were the main Visual interest with some overzealous confetti canons, lasers and and strobes… but these wristbands. They were the highlight of the show for me. They were synchronized to the entire lighting scheme and were not overused. The effect they provided was epic and beautiful. Now don’t get me wrong, I was dancing my ass of at my seat beside the stage. Aside from the 4 down tempo tracks, which really didn’t do it for me, or many people sitting near me, (All checking Facebook or Sportsnet on their phones) it was a great rock concert; again, I stress concert. The music was the most interesting part and there was really nothing new. They played all the hits and a few new songs from Mylo Xyloto, including Paradise, which brought down the house. In usual Coldplay style, the encore began with the band playing right in the crowd and it ended with a bang. At two hours, it seemed a little short but I wasn’t left wanting more. I had a great time listening to great music and dancing; but then again, I could have done that at home… One last thing, I have gained a real appreciation for the drummer in Coldplay. Over the course of the show, he played drums, guitar, digital percussion pad, timpani and bells. Hell, he played the guitar and the drums at the same time! He also is the primary harmony vocalist and had a few vocal solo’s as well. And it’s not just gimmicky stuff either. His contribution to the live concert experience is substantial. I hope he gets his dues both within the group and from fans who listen and watch. [thanks http://joeyvantol.ca/review/coldplay-vancouver-420]

Media Reviews

20 April 2012: Rogers Arena, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Coldplay pulls out all its spectacular gimmicks for first of two Vancouver concerts

Straight.com: If Coldplay proved anything with its Rogers Arena concert on Friday, it’s that it knows what it's doing. If you're going to play a concert in a stadium, this is how you do it: make the audience go absolutely apeshit right off the bat, and keep it on your side for the next 90 minutes. And if the band sometimes resorted to gimmicks to achieve that at the first of its two Vancouver shows, so be it. They were, after all, pretty spectacular gimmicks.

When the English quartet made its entrance, it did so to the flashing of thousands of multi-coloured wristbands, timed to light up right as the band launched into "Mylo Xyloto". Then came the confetti cannons, which dumped a veritable blizzard of paper shapes—hearts, crowns, teardrops—onto the audience. And then down came the balloons, which descended from the rafters and were then batted about the room by a sea of eager hands. One headed straight for me. I swung my fist at it, and when I connected, the balloon burst open and showered me with still more of those paper shapes. And that was all within the first 10 minutes. Anyone not solidly in Coldplay's corner by that point was probably a cynical old fuck. Hell, I'm a cynical old fuck and even I thought it was pretty okay.

Did all the DayGlo confetti and rainbow-hued lasers distract from the music? Sure, but in that department frontman Chris Martin promised to deliver "119 percent". Despite the mathematical implausibility of that claim, the band did give its fans a lot. At least 104 percent. Coldplay's influences aren't hard to pinpoint, but Martin and his cohorts (guitarist Jonny Buckland, bassist Guy Berryman, and drummer Will Champion) have avoided the excesses that have plagued its antecedents. Coldplay has never alienated large portions of its listenership by diving down the rabbit hole of experimental inclinations. (And yes, that is a dig at Radiohead.) Nor has Martin, despite fully embodying the persona of outsized rock frontman, become infuriatingly self-important. (And you know perfectly well who I'm talking about there.)

All of which may position Coldplay in the middle of the road, but there are worse places to be. Leaving aside the bells and whistles—to say nothing of the lasers and confetti cannons and video-assisted duets with Rihanna—a Coldplay concert is an event because Martin knows how to connect with an audience. Yes, he skipped up and down the catwalk clapping his hands like a ponce on Friday night, but even that was endearing, in a dorky kind of way. Also, Coldplay can rock the fuck out when it wants to. Well, okay—no, it can't. But it came close with "Yellow". And with "Viva La Vida", it showed that it can do anthemic on a scale grand enough to get a whole arena singing along. Everyone with the possible exception of one cynical old fuck, that is, and even he was tempted, for a second. [2]


20 April 2012: Rogers Arena, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Review: Coldplay turns its fans on in Vancouver

Walking into the first of two sold-out Coldplay concerts at Rogers Arena Friday night, fans were handed a strange wristband they were asked to put on. On the wristband, the Twitter hashtag #coldplayfilm was printed, referring to to a forthcoming live DVD (the first since 2003) that will be shot at an unknown date on the band's current tour for latest album Mylo Xyloto. There was also a plastic radio-controled device attached to the wristband, each a different colour -- yellow, pink, blue, white...

No, it wasn't a tool for some kind of nefarious mind-control experiment, but rather a tiny lighting device that would later turn the entire arena into a giant bowl of twinkling specks, each individual joining the rest of the crowd in becoming a part of the concert's elaborate visual elements. To say that Coldplay's latest appearance in Vancouver was a communal experience would be to understate the obvious. Singer Chris Martin, guitarist Jonny Buckland, bassist Guy Berryman and drummer Will Champion have proven to be masters at connecting with their audiences and making their audiences connect with them, even when they didn't have the kind of stadium-sized gadgetry that was on display Friday night, from the myriad flashing "glowbands," to lasers, balloons, confetti and more. Coldplay's material - heartfelt rock with a genuine loving feel that hasn't really changed all that much over the years - hits you exactly where it counts. And when you add a phenomenally oversized sound and a "we're all in this together" visual element like the glowbands, you have a concert that lingers in your mind for a long time. This one will definitely stick.

Opening with a recording of the main theme from Back To The Future, Coldplay launched into Hurts Like Heaven, Rogers Arena blinking from not just glowbands but also camera flashes and cell phones. Multiple circular screens lit up to show Martin, Buckland, Berryman and Champion doing their thing. Martin, as always, was the one that smiled the brightest, an infectious beaming grin that lit up the place as much as all the flashing, blinking stuff did. "Is there anybody out there?" Martin asked. "Anybody ready to have a good time?"

It didn't take long for the place to be filled with confetti thanks to a spectacular In My Place, the lead-off single from what is arguably Coldplay's best album, 2002's A Rush of Blood to the Head, Martin running down the catwalk to pump his fist in the air as canons blasted bits of paper shaped like birds, butterflies, hearts and flowers onto his fans. The concert was an oversized spectacle for a large-hearted band: giant balloons popped out during Major Minus, the entire crowd sang along with Martin during The Scientist ("Nobody said it was easy..."), and the place was one big collective smile during breakout hit Yellow, a song that still manages to get fans all worked up over a decade later.

Granted it was all rather soft-edged and pretty tame, save for a few songs like Violet Hill where Buckland worked his guitar with sharper strokes, and a U2-worthy God Put A Smile Upon Your Face. Coldplay then moved over to the X-shaped stage at the end of the catwalk for a softer segment including Princess of China with the added presence of Rihanna singing on screen, Up In Flames and a delicate Warning Sign, Martin serenading his fans behind his neon paint-splattered piano. In the end you couldn't help but be swept away by singalong Paradise, which made full use of the crowd's help singing Martin's trademark "ooh-woah-ohs" and lit up every glowband in the house, an Us Against the World played in the stands, and encore Clocks (lasers galore), Fix You and finale Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall. "Thank you for giving us the best job in the world," Martin said on a few occasions. It sure looked like the four Brits were having a ball.

In the opening slot, New York-based sister duo The Pierces - Allison Margaret and Catherine Eleanor - channeled the more ethereal, psych-laden folk-rock vibes of Stevie Nicks and Heart. The sisters' presence was probably mainly due to Berryman producing their latest album You & I, but the pair has been active for a number of years. Another act with more experience under its belt than they let on was British act Metronomy, who has been around for a decade and whose synth-heavy rock didn't always click.

Not to slag their attention-worthy The English Riviera, which was nominated for the prestigious Mercury Prize last year, but the band's new wave-inspired, wobbly bass stomp would have been better suited for the after-party rather than the warm-up slot. If you're going Saturday night, note that Dallas Green's City and Colour is opening in place of Metronomy. That being said, if you are going Saturday and dared read all the way through this review and all its spoilers, you're still in for a treat. Because for a solid 90 minutes at Rogers Arena Friday night, Coldplay made the world a little bit brighter.[3]


Coldplay go big, but not stupid, with Rogers Arena mega-concert

When you’re one of the biggest bands in the world, you probably are expected to have one of the biggest concert productions in the world. This, Coldplay provided Friday. It wasn’t as extravagant as, say, U2’s ill-starred and expensive Pop show, which is an example of the “more money than brains” tour that often strikes popular acts. Coldplay is too sensible for that.

Nonetheless, the band filled Rogers Arena with swirling screens, lasers, balloons, showers of confetti, three stages, graffiti-inspired visuals and the piece de resistance, issuing all concert-goers with wristbands that lit up at crucial moments, presumably with the single press of a button by a lighting tech. In a second, 15,000 fans lit up and swathed the darkened arena in a blanket of multicoloured glow. No doubt Coldplay does this every night of its current North American tour, but hang the cost, the band can afford it and still not tip over the money-to-brain line. It’s an amazing sight. Almost makes the music, which is at the bottom line of all this, take a backseat. Coldplay, which is back at the arena Saturday night, put in its best Vancouver appearance by far. It helps that it is touring on the strength of its best album, Mylo Xyloto, whose selections dominated the night. Mylo purportedly is the story of a woman trying to find love in an apocalyptic world. That message might or might not be a unifying theme, but it does hint at its cohesion. If previous album Viva La Vida sprawled and, ultimately, was aimless, Mylo is tighter and more complex. The band, led by Chris Martin, is exploiting background vocals (or sing-song chants that stir up the fans); and the sound is more dense, reaching its peak, Friday, with “Paradise,” but climaxing effectively with the churchy “Every Teardrop Is a Waterfall.”

By comparison, a familiar “Clocks” from Coldplay’s A Rush Of Blood to the Head is simpler, almost transparent in its relatively clean lines. Martin has become an ingratiating frontman, suitably humble and frequently smiling, and is ably supported by Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland and Will Champion, who’ve all grown into showmen. Squeezed into a small space at the front of the stage, opening act The Pierces never announced itself. The quartet just showed up and then disappeared after its set. Somehow this was appropriate. Unless on a mission to make the world safe for a China Crisis revival, the band is irrelevant.[4]


Coldplay sells its soul in Vancouver

"Is it true that everyone in Vancouver is stoned today?" asked Coldplay's Chris Martin, seven songs into Friday night's concert at Rogers Arena.

His joke produced a big cheer, although obviously a chap of his gentle demeanour wouldn't be involved with any of those uncouth 4/20 shenanigans. This is a man whose rock and roll charm is more debonair than prone to debauchery. At the show's start, he promised his band would "give 119 per cent" and do their best to provide a great night's entertainment. Textbook rock and roll introduction. Acknowledging concertgoers' parking and babysitting expenses in the very next sentence was a significant deviation from the script.

Martin has transformed himself from sensitive songwriter to rock's great salesman. Not in a "drink Pepsi" way. Quite the opposite. He's selling himself and his band. He's doing it sincerely and he's doing it with charisma. And, judging by the response from a full house of adoring fans Friday night, an awful lot of people are buying it.

"In My Place" was only the second song of the night, but at its first chorus Martin was galloping along the stage's runway, throwing his arms in the air as plumes of paper leaves blasted into Rogers Arena around him. That was just one of many touches of production brilliance. Everyone with a ticket was issued an illuminated wristband on entry. When the house lights dropped, 10,000 swaying arms lit up the room instead. Giant beach balls were launched. Colossal inflatable butterflies appeared in the arena's upper level. But the most spectacular moments always came directly from Chris Martin.

It was his enthusiasm that triggered a massive call and response sing-along from the crowd during "The Scientist," which the band followed by launching into a rowdy version of "Yellow" that saw Martin narrowly miss cracking himself in the face with his guitar neck. During "God Put A Smile Upon Your Face" Martin instructed everyone on the upper level to put their hands in the air, softly encouraging the one non-conformer to join in – "I see you in the blue shirt". In perhaps the highlight of the entire show, mid-way through "When I Ruled The World" Martin snatched a red bra out of the air, presumably thrown in his general direction by an admirer, then collapsed to the ground at the song's end to soak up the moment.

It's not hard to see why Gwyneth Paltrow and more than a few women in Vancouver find him so dreamy. Chris Martin is the lead singer of an astonishingly successful, arena-filling band. But he's a different kind of rock star. Sensitive. Gentle. Understanding. This isn't sex appeal. This is cuddle appeal.

Coldplay has become one of the biggest bands on Earth and the credit lies entirely with Martin. Guitarist Johnny Buckland joined his frontman to throw rock poses a few times, drummer Will Champion banged away with surprising ferocity while Guy Berryman was the epitome of bass player anonymity. All the excitement, the entire show essentially, came from Chris Martin.

Chris Martin believes that Coldplay is the biggest and best band on the planet. He has the will and sincerity in his rock star moves to make arenas believe it too.

Which must be the heart of their continued enormity, because even in the sonic cauldron of Rogers Arena "Princess of China" (performed with a video projection of Rihanna), "When I Ruled The World,""Paradise," "Fix You" and so many more, if you closed your eyes to subtract Martin's charisma, are award-winning yet achingly pedestrian slabs of indie-pop by numbers.

Not that anyone left Rogers Arena disappointed. Chris Martin had delivered. The crowd loved it. But it was Martin, openly and genuinely relishing that love, who enjoyed it most of all.

"Most of you are under the influence of soft drugs," he laughed during the encore, "but we'll take it!"

http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120421/bc_coldplay_vancouver_concert_120421/20120421/?hub=BritishColumbiaHome


Stunning spectacle of sight, sound

When you're one of the biggest bands in the world, you probably are expected to have one of the biggest concert productions in the world. This, Coldplay provided Friday. It wasn't as extravagant as, say, U2's ill-starred and expensive Pop show, which is an example of the "moremoney-than-brains" tour that often strikes popular acts. Coldplay is too sensible for that. Nonetheless, the English band filled Rogers Arena with swirling screens, lasers, balloons, showers of confetti, three stages, graffiti-inspired visuals, and the pièce de résistance: issuing all concertgoers with wristbands that lit up at crucial moments, presumably with the single press of a button by a lighting tech. In a second, 15,000 fans lit up and swathed the darkened arena in a blanket of multicoloured glow. No doubt Coldplay does this every night of its current North American tour, but hang the cost, the band can afford it and still not tip over the money-to-brain line. It's an amazing sight. Almost makes the music, which is at the bottom line of all this, take a back seat. Coldplay, which also played the arena Saturday night, put in its best Vancouver appearance by far. It helps that it is touring on the strength of its best album, Mylo Xyloto, whose selections dominated the night. Mylo purportedly is the story of a woman trying to find love in an apocalyptic world. That message might or might not be a unifying theme, but it does hint at its cohesion. If previous album Viva La Vida sprawled and, ultimately, was aimless, Mylo is tighter and more complex. The band, led by Chris Martin, is exploiting background vocals (or singsong chants that stir up the fans), and the sound is more dense, reaching its peak Friday with "Paradise," but climaxing effectively with the churchy "Every Teardrop is a Waterfall." By comparison, a familiar "Clocks" from Coldplay's A Rush of Blood to the Head is simpler, almost transparent in its relatively clean lines. Martin has become an ingratiating frontman, suitably humble and frequently smiling, and is ably supported by Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland and Will Champion, who've all grown into showmen. Squeezed into a small space at the front of the stage, opening act The Pierces never announced itself. The quartet just showed up and then disappeared after its set. Somehow this was appropriate. Unless on a mission to make the world safe for a China Crisis revival, the band is irrelevant.

http://www.theprovince.com/Stunning+spectacle+sight+sound/6499192/story.html

Twitter Updates

  • @Jayreg1969: on tour bus driving to vancouver -- through the rockies -- Stunning !!!!!
  • @ElsietheB: @coldplay concert in Vancouver tonight! #soexcited #waitingsincechristmas
  • @oxfamontour: Just got to arena. Shout out if your heading to the @coldplay gig tonight in #Vancouver pic.twitter.com/inkvUWvS
  • @brendaaaa424: @coldplay tonight in Vancouver!!! SO EXCITED! :D
  • @Mateus_s96: 6 more hours! #Coldplay #Vancouver
  • @DavidEbner: Coldplay gear in Rogers Arena hallway. Music Fri & Sat- hockey (unknown time) Sunday. #Canucks yfrog.com/mnz0toxj
  • @D6MERIT: Awesome to meet some of @Coldplay at their kick around @BCplace yesterday. Looking forward to their show tonight! yfrog.com/oc755yzj
  • @daboych: At coldplay in vancouver, wow these opening acts are awful, going to have to pound the beers to get through them
  • @AdamHyslop: Loving the remote controlled LED bracelets at this @Coldplay concert in Vancouver! Epic show as always. pic.twitter.com/JZ2Ks1sD
  • @FMarchandVS: Somewhere in this avalanche of confetti is @Coldplay's Chris Martin #coldplay #Vancouver #InMyPlace pic.twitter.com/i81TDEMt
  • @SelenaSandhu: #coldplay in Vancouver, already 1 of the best concerts I've been! everyone's got a light bracelet, lights and more lights!
  • @m3lissa: I've seen Girl Talk, Chromeo and Rich Aucoin do confetti... But tonight I learned that Coldplay are the confetti kings. Bloody. Brilliant.
  • @ariellelindy: "I'm pretty sure everyone in Vancouver is stoned right now, which makes us the perfect band for today!" @coldplay
  • @karenHRpro: #Coldplay rocked Vancouver!
  • @bebecaca @coldplay in #Vancouver was amazing!!!
  • @WoodGooding: #Coldplay best concert ever in Vancouver! You were magic!
  • @emilyradio953: Sweet explosion of colours at the #coldplay concert. What a great show! #vancouver pic.twitter.com/dHwHXwJN
  • @amandamaclean_: @coldplay that was amazing. #vancouver thanks you.
  • @niikiidee: @coldplay best concert by far I've been to! Thank you! #vancouver
  • @christyf5: Yeah! Another awesome @coldplay show. Thanks for coming to #vancouver
  • @monrueda: @coldplay Breathtaking show today in Vancouver!!! You made me feel in Paradise. Thank you!
  • @lightboxgallery: Thanks to Chris Martin of @coldplay for signing autographs after tonight's' show in Vancouver! Class act as always! pic.twitter.com/NRvu3wdR
  • @Dash8Curtis: Just saw #Coldplay put on an amazing show in Vancouver #wow #unreal #rockedmyworld
  • @alissaskins: @coldplay THANK YOU SO MUCH Chris, Guy, Jonny & Will for putting on such an amazingly epic show in Vancouver!!!! Canada loves you!!!! :)
  • @Klbnicholson: Thank you @coldplay for an amazing night #vancouver
  • @Czastley: @coldplay Awesome Vancouver concert last night!! The wristbands were the coolest thing I've ever seen! Thanks for everything :)
  • @studiojeanie: well that was just all sorts of fabulous last night with @coldplay in #vancouver! (: pic.twitter.com/qjQiVtBs
  • @Jayreg1969: Last Night was so AWESOME Crowd Happy Phil Harvy man who put faith in me happy ! Chris the band Happy !!
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